Honda CBR600F
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The Honda CBR600F is a motorcycle with no real consistency.

It has changed countless times and even discontinued once before its 2011 revival in a modernized form. However, throughout all this time and underneath all of its many faces, the Honda CBR600F has retained the best qualities that the CBR series has to offer, all while remaining true to its essence as an inline-four sports bike.

The Rise of the CBR600F

The CBR600F, also known as the Hurricane, was first produced in 1987. The CBR600F was among the first inline four-cylinder motorcycles that Honda ever produced

Alongside models such as the CBR750F and the CBR1000F, the CBR600F was in good company. In fact almost each model in the entire CBR series remained in high consumer standing for the duration of their production timelines.

Within only four years, the designers at Honda decided that it was time to update the Hurricane and outfit it with enough design alterations to warrant giving it a wholly new name: The CBR600F2. All-in-all, the design remained similar throughout the entire revision process from generation to generation, with a few key points to notice.

Never the Same Design

The designers at Honda must have either fallen in love with the CBR600F or absolutely hated it. One way or another, they couldn’t take their minds off of it long enough to let go more than four years without any significant redesigns.

The original model, produced from 1987 to 1990, now bears almost no similarity, visual or technical, to the version released in 2014. Not even the engine displacements are the same Arguably the only primary unifier between these two models is the fact that Honda gave them the same name.

Honda Just Couldn’t Stop

Because of Honda’s incessant fixation on redesigning the CBR600F over and over again every few years, between 1987 and 2019, seven generations were produced. That comes out to an average of one generation for just about every 3.86 years. Of course, to cover them all, we would need far more time than we have, so let’s stick to the two most important generations.

Honda CBR600F (1987-1990)

The original generation of the CBR600F eventually gave way to the production of the CBR600F2, F3, F4, and F4i before the model’s temporary discontinuation between 2007 and 2010.

The first Hurricane featured a four-stroke, inline, four-cylinder, DOHC engine with four valves per cylinder, a 598cc engine capacity, and a top speed of just about 142 miles per hour.

Honda CBR600F (2011-2013)

When Honda brought the CBR600F back out of retirement, it came back starkly different from ever before. This motorcycle supported significantly increased horsepower and torque and also had a remodeled aluminum mono-backbone frame.

The CBR600F is Just as Good as Ever

You might think that any model of motorcycle that goes through so many edits so quickly must have something wrong with it. According to bloggers and other reviewers, that’s just not the case. Not only are the models just as much fun to ride in 2019 as in 2011 or earlier, but they are designed to last for plenty more years to come.

Missing from Hollywood

As of 2019, there have not been any television or film productions that included the CBR600F, nor have any prominent celebrities expressed their endorsements of the sub-series.

Social Groups

Despite the lack of Hollywood’s inclusion of the CBR600F in the entertainment industry, this sub-series has still managed to procure quite an online following, with one such group gathering more than 6,000 members.

The Honda CBR600F – The Hurricane

Honda’s Hurricane may never have reached the category five power of the FireBlade or the Super Blackbird, but speed isn’t everything. This sub-series was a powerhouse in its own light. Of course, the only way to explain this is for you to go ride one yourself. So what are you waiting for?

Author

editor@carsandmileswebsite.com